• Note to Self: You Don’t Get Out of this World Alive

    successThe definition of success is often heavily influenced by our family, friends and colleagues. They will ask you and assess what, in their minds, you have accomplished. They don’t know always know or understand what is important to you. Finding personal fulfillment requires us to take a very personal look at how we define success and look inside ourselves for that answer. And while you may think that’s the hard part, it is usually just the beginning of a wonderful journey.

    Last night I went to dinner with my mom and her best friend, who asked me what would I do if I could start all over now that I am older, wiser and with career “success” under my belt. I didn’t hesitate since in my heart of hearts I know that while writing, speaking and helping people and organizations is in my blood and is what I am creating now as my life, I would become a chef so I can share my passion for clean and healthy eating with others.

    It would not be a life of endless meetings at the PowerPoint sausage factory. Continue reading

  • It’s Time to Celebrate … Yourself

    celI am wary of our celebrity culture. Celebrating people who are in the public eye: movie stars, TV stars, musicians, athletes, social medis gurus, millionaires, billionaires and the list goes on and on and on. I am amazed at the awe and admiration that these people get from the public. The pedestal they are on as “successful” people. It doesn’t matter what part of the world I am in, it is the same level of admiration. Is this part of human nature to define success by how much your are in the public eye and wealthy you are? Can someone please explain this to me?

    Just because someone has money or is higher up the ladder of success doesn’t mean they should be treated as better than anyone else. Too many people have been socialized into a misleading belief system that takes years to unlearn. What does it say that Brangelina is a Wikipedia entry and that Honey Boo Boo has over 2 million viewers? Continue reading

  • There is an opportunity every time we fall

    Oops!

    Oops!

    Why is it that when we accidentally fall down, the first instinct we have is to look around and see who saw us fall?

    • Is it because we want to assess the damage of how humiliated we should be?
    • Are we trying to figure out how mortified or embarrassed we should be that we could not stay balanced by seeing how many people are laughing at the goofiness of our meeting the ground unexpectedly?
    •  And, why is it that only after we assess the emotional damage, we can then try to determine the physical injury of your fall?

    All these questions came into my head yesterday when I was eating breakfast and a 10-year old girl having breakfast with her family found herself on the floor. It happened really fast and I watched her chair flip and her body crash to the ground. She looked around mortified as her family’s first reaction was one of hysterical laughter. Not one of them asked her whether she was ok. They simply helped her up and discussed how the chair lost its balance. She looked at me. I was not laughing. Her cheeks went beet red as she sat there rubbing her elbows. The sound of laughter was probably still ringing in her ears.

    What would you do today if no one laughed at you if you fell? Why do you care what other people see?

  • The Road to Wellness is Tough and Yet, Rewarding

    TimeWhat have you done for YOURself today?

    We are socialized into a broken system that surrounds us each day of our life. It is sad but true that many people go through their life living someone else’s expectations of them: whether it is being a wife or husband, a parent, a worker, a community member, a citizen and an overall human being. We get sucked into peer pressure and false notions of “success.”

    I ran away from home this year for my birthday. This is the first of many trips. It is going to be a life long celebration of my birth and it is beginning with this trip. I am focused not so much on QTR (quality time remaining) but QTB (quality time beginning). I no longer worry about disappointing anyone else in my life apart from myself. And no, I have not become a mega-narcissist (and believe me, I am sure since I once was married to one). I have spent this past year, since firing myself from corporate America, doing the really hard work. And it’s paying off. I am seeing improvements in all areas of my health and wellness. Continue reading

  • Letting Go and Breathing

    If there is something within you that needs healing, you could start by letting go of the past. If you are holding on to something — a person, place, situation, memory, hurt, or regret — that is really doing you no favors. I know it’s easier said than done to tell someone to move on, but really,we all need to release that which doesn’t belong in our lives. And at the same time, we need to find what’s working and give it more focus as it will help us make that change we’ve wanted to make  in our life like finding a new job.

    Take a minute and a white space or a piece of paper. Draw three boxes (as best you can):

    cross

    As you do this, you will find that your physical health and well-being improve — from rising energy levels and vanishing aches and pains to feeling much happier in yourself.

    So say goodbye to your baggage and prepare to feel a whole lot lighter. I did and I feel lighter every day.

  • What Shakespeare said: “Wisely, and slow. They stumble that run fast”

    stonesWhen you are transitioning from a job, it takes time to start seeing, especially if you were at an organization or role for many years. This is what happened to me. And I can only appreciate it now in retrospect.

    As Albert  Camus shared: “A [wo/man's] work is nothing but this slow trek to rediscover, through the detours of art, those two or three great and simple images in whose presence his heart first opened.” Continue reading

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